The Red Queen Review

The Red Queen Review See a Problem?

But since then I have read both positive and negative reviews regarding the 'Red Queen', and grew more and more nervous about beginning. S P O I L E R A L E R T! This review might contain spoilers for the books of the '​Red Queen' series. If you'd like to read about the first book, '. Red Queen book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. The author of Alice takes readers back down the rabbit hole to a dark, t. Power is a dangerous game. This beautiful paperback box set includes the first two books in Victoria Aveyard's #1 New York Times bestselling Red Queen. - Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard Series: Red Queen #1 Pages: Hardcover Summary: Red Queen is an interesting book about a society that.

The Red Queen Review

- Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard Series: Red Queen #1 Pages: Hardcover Summary: Red Queen is an interesting book about a society that. Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard is set in a Red and Silver world. People with red blood have no special powers and serve the strong Silver blooded people who. Power is a dangerous game. This beautiful paperback box set includes the first two books in Victoria Aveyard's #1 New York Times bestselling Red Queen. Review. PRAISE FOR RED QUEEN: “A sizzling, imaginative thriller, where romance and revolution collide, where power and justice duel. It's exhilarating. Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard! | Spoiler Free Review von Hailey in Bookland vor 5 Jahren 7 Minuten, 54 Sekunden Aufrufe Stalk me. Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard is set in a Red and Silver world. People with red blood have no special powers and serve the strong Silver blooded people who. - What a thrill this book was to read! From the beginning I knew, only someone with great imagination could have written this book. It begins with a.

Speaking of dual natures, Margaret herself is not always seen in the best of lights. As a story's heroine, there are times where she is hardly likable.

Kudos to Gregory for maintaining character, and thus story, integrity. Tell it like it is and let the chips fall where they may! Sometimes that makes for the best fiction, and The Red Queen , as a historical fiction, definitely ranks right up there!

Rating: 4. View all 10 comments. Sep 15, Patricia rated it it was amazing. When I read the reviews and everyone hated this book, I had to read it.

As it turns out, everyone hates the heroine, but I didn't. I felt sorry for her, and I had to laugh at her self-absorption and self-vindication, but this is a girl raised to believe that blood lines matter, and that her only possible contribution is as a brood mare.

She is married twice with no say in the matter; her last marriage she negotiates for herself. I appreciate this book. I appreciate the hard work and research Greg When I read the reviews and everyone hated this book, I had to read it.

I appreciate the hard work and research Gregory had to put into writing it as accurately as possible. I appreciate the thought she had to put into it figuring out what her motivations might have been, and making them plausible.

There were times Gregory had me laughing - this woman prays for everything, but also interprets God's will always with an eye to her advancement, and the kingship of her son.

This is a very complicated time in English history, the Cousins Wars, sometimes called the War of Roses. Kings weren't kings for very long, and sometimes they were king and then not and then king again.

It would be a terrible time to be a noble, who do you support? Especially when the penalty for choosing wrong can mean loss of your head, not to mention all your hereditary titles and lands?

This is a book about the exercise of power, and the exercise of power from a position of powerlessness. Gregory lays out the problems women have at this time.

Few educate women beyond religious works and embroidery skills. Not that many people can read, so why waste the skill on a woman?

And once you give a woman a little book-learning, why maybe she will get ideas beyond her station, know what I mean? Oh aarrgh!

All three books in the Cousin's War series weave together, and should be read in close succession. The Lady of the Rivers and The White Queen feature more likable women, but all deal with women and power and the risks they take exercising that power.

While Jaquetta and Elizabeth are beautiful, golden and charming, Margaret is persistent and adaptable, and she prevails. I don't like her, but I like this book.

View 2 comments. Feb 13, Iset rated it it was ok Recommends it for: People who want a light, breezy read rather than something meatier.

Shelves: medieval-agetoce-fiction. I was surprised, but I actually ended up liking this novel a shade better than "The White Queen".

There's much less of the Melusina magic, which I really felt was used too much as a deus ex machina in "The White Queen". The relationship with Jasper Tudor, although completely fictional, was intriguing and even more so because I knew it could never truly be realised.

The one-liners here and there. I actually liked Margaret's steadfastness and singlemindedness, and whilst her ruthlessness is shocki I was surprised, but I actually ended up liking this novel a shade better than "The White Queen".

I actually liked Margaret's steadfastness and singlemindedness, and whilst her ruthlessness is shocking to modern sensibilities at the same time I didn't feel like it was out of place in the brutal Medieval world in which Margaret moved.

At points, Margaret is downright mean, however whilst I didn't like her mean actions I could still understand what drove her to them, the pride and jealousy that she harbours.

That said, the book had its problems. One problem was the sheer repetition. This seems to be a consistent problem throughout many of Gregory's books — Elizabeth Woodville has her legend of Melusina, Mary Queen of Scots has her "I am three times a queen", Catherine Howard has her "Let me see, what do I have now" Margaret Beaufort has an obsession with Joan of Arc.

Margaret Beaufort was a pious woman, we know this from history. Gregory feels the inexplicable need to demonstrate this by giving her character an obsession with Joan of Arc, and then repeatedly drumming this into us throughout the book.

Give your readers a little credit and stop repeating things like this. Moreover, the Joan of Arc stuff isn't the only repetition you'll encounter in the book.

Characters who should be on close terms with one another call each by full name and title, just in case we've forgotten who they are for the past pages or so.

Occasionally some spelling and grammatical errors have crept in - which wouldn't be worth mentioning except they unfortunately change the meaning of the whole sentence - and here and there I stumbled across some strange sentences which just sounded clunky and poorly constructed, though this is not the first time I've noticed this in Philippa Gregory's works.

I felt like Gregory should have chosen a perspective and stuck with it all the way through. Personally I think third person works best for historical fiction, since it covers so many events that one person alone is rarely present at for all.

However, probably my biggest gripe with this book was the fact that Gregory never comes to grips with the real meat of the history.

This is actually a complaint about all of her books as this is another feature which plagues her writing consistently. The historical events feel glossed over with a broad brush and largely trivialised, reduced to a ten person cast and all the social complexity of who is friends with whom, ignoring the wider picture and the larger issues behind conflicts.

Many of the momentous events which make up the most exciting happenings of whichever period Gregory is writing about are related in past tense and they occur offstage, and we are told about them in a sentence or two.

This is a huge let down as a reader, as these moments are the turning points of their day, exciting events of truly huge significance.

This first example comes from page of the edition I read no spoilers, this is known historical fact : "Amazingly, Edward gets to London without a single obstacle in his path, the gates are thrown open for him by the adoring citizens, and he is reunited with his wife, as if he had never been chased from his own land, running for his life.

Yet, Gregory summarises them in a single sentence which glosses over all this, and worse it all occurs offstage and we never get to see any of these thrilling events!

The following quote comes from page of the edition I was reading: "News comes in snippets from the outside world, carried by housemaids as gossip from the market.

Richard declares that the marriage between the queen, Elizabeth Woodville, and King Edward was never valid as Edward was pre-contracted to another lady before he married Elizabeth in secret.

He declares all their children bastards and himself as the only York heir. What do we get? A summary that greatly simplifies and glosses over events.

The biggest disappointment of all is the Battle of Bosworth Field. Here Gregory finally has to bite the bullet and write it in real time in order to give her story some sort of climax What I felt was overwhelmingly disappointment that such a great historical moment, on which virtually everything hinged for the two opposing leaders, could be so thoroughly screwed up.

How can you screw up writing the Battle of Bosworth Field? I so wanted to give this book 3 stars out of 5, as there were a number of things about it which I did like and enjoy, but I have to concede that the number of problems outweighs the good points, meaning I can't in all honesty give it more than 2 stars If there was an option to award half stars I might well be using it right now.

Even though I so wanted this novel to be better than it was, let's face it, in the end this is lightweight historical fiction, this is the Wars of the Roses Lite.

Nov 16, Robin rated it it was ok Shelves: historical-fiction. I have no idea if Margaret Beaufort was as she is depicted by Gregory, but her fictional alter ego is the most unlikeable person that I have come across in a novel in years.

The first-person narrative gave little escape from this fanatical and self-absorbed woman. Henry Tudor's ascension to the throne as Henry VII is a a fascinating and unlikely story, but neither mother, the true believer in his destiny despite its apparent impossibility, nor Henry VII whom I am more familiar with historically I have no idea if Margaret Beaufort was as she is depicted by Gregory, but her fictional alter ego is the most unlikeable person that I have come across in a novel in years.

Henry Tudor's ascension to the throne as Henry VII is a a fascinating and unlikely story, but neither mother, the true believer in his destiny despite its apparent impossibility, nor Henry VII whom I am more familiar with historically are going to win any warmth of personality awards.

Margaret Beaufort had a rough life in many ways, and maybe her single-minded devotion to see her son, a virtual stranger, on the English throne as the last of the Lancasters is admirable at times, but neither of these characters have personalities that make for good company page after page after page, and Gregory does little but give a superficial understanding of who they were or why Jasper Tudor or anyone else would love Margaret.

I found the character studies limited with no reward for my perseverance in finishing the novel.

View all 12 comments. Sep 26, BAM The Bibliomaniac rated it really liked it Shelves: british-historical-fiction , series-have-read , own.

Audiobook Nov 14, Sarah rated it really liked it. Historical fiction is a passion of mine and I personally think that Philippa Gregory is one of the masters of the genre.

I always find her books to be so well researched that as a reader you feel like you are experiencing that particular time first hand.

This is the second book in the new cousins war series and I did find this novel hard going at first but after the first 50 pages I found myself completely absorbed in this novel and felt like I was there watching events unfold in front of my eyes Historical fiction is a passion of mine and I personally think that Philippa Gregory is one of the masters of the genre.

This is the second book in the new cousins war series and I did find this novel hard going at first but after the first 50 pages I found myself completely absorbed in this novel and felt like I was there watching events unfold in front of my eyes.

The same time frame of The White Queen is used in this novel and at first I was skeptical and did not think it would work.

However I felt it worked well within the context of the novel and really seemed to link the first and second book in the Cousins was series.

Margaret Beaufort is not the easiest of characters to like and I did find in places that I wanted to escape from the first-person narrative in places.

However once I finished The Red Queen and I was reflecting the character of Margaret Beaufort I actually found myself liking the character and I think the harshness of her characters adds a lot of charm and authenticity to the novel.

Overall I found The Red Queen to be a well researched novel that took you into the heart of the beginning of Tudor England.

It is not my favourite Philippa Gregory novel however it does show why she is considered one of the masters of the genre.

May 03, Andrea rated it it was amazing Shelves: world-book-night-books. This is the second book from this author I've read. I got it cheap with the Daily Mail in duty free and I see why.

I was shocked at Gregory's choice of using the same time frame as The White Queen, although she included the story of Magaret from when she was 7 the main story line was the same, revolving around the same events.

Since you knew what was going to happen next and who was true and who wasn't Gregory destroyed her best assesst, intrigue.

You could skip chapters I wouldn't but the I got it cheap with the Daily Mail in duty free and I see why. You could skip chapters I wouldn't but the possibility is there and still understand what was going on.

As to narrative Gregory stuck to repeating the same things 1 How much of a whore, witch and beautiful Elizabeth Woodville was 2 It is God's will that her son be King 3 She is destined to be Joan of Arc like This got really reaaaaallllllllyyy boring after a while, I kept going because I thought it would get better, sadly mistaken.

Magaret was a stuffy, over-religeous, greedy,patronising,obsessed woman and as much as Gregory tried to make her slightly positive with her comparision of the inspiration of Joan of Arc she couldn't disguise it.

I didn't, in fact couldn't like her and therefore didn't enjoy the book. If you don't like the main character you are gonna be hearing a lot about somone you hate and where's the fun in that?

As ever it was well-written, but this is now expected from Gregory so overall, worth a read if you are going to keep going with the series but otherwise not worth it really.

View 1 comment. He dies soon after that but manages to get her pregnant before that. After her son Henry is born, Margaret devotes her life to get him on the throne.

By page 60 I just wanted to stab her. I read that way many times. I think the book suffer from first person narrative. Margaret spends most of her time in the countryside and much of the happenings must be told in letters.

Dec 12, Kelly rated it it was ok Shelves: never-read-again. Margaret Beaufort is a horrible, selfish woman who thinks of no one but herself.

God she angered me so much!! I've never read a character who I have wanted to punch more than her. It is all about her, her rise, her power because she was destined for greatness and she doesn't care who gets hurt along the way.

She's made me so angry!! The story was pretty decent but the best bit was the battle description at the end. I loved Henry Stafford her 2nd husband who was obviously treated like crap and th Margaret Beaufort is a horrible, selfish woman who thinks of no one but herself.

I loved Henry Stafford her 2nd husband who was obviously treated like crap and the relationship with her last husband was basically what she deserved; cold, calculating and simply for personal gain.

In all I think it's got to be 2 stars because she's such an awful, selfish cow. Sep 23, Sara rated it really liked it Shelves: borrowed-from-library , historical-fiction.

Who knows what I would have thought of Margaret if I had known her, but I found her a bit unlikable. View all 4 comments. Aug 11, Anita added it Shelves: adult , romance , historical.

I am listening to this book via audio, and I can honestly say I'm not enjoying this as much as I usually enjoy Philippa Gregory's books. This book is very political and while it involves the Court, it's not such a big part of the book.

I don't think it's the writing that is bothering me though, I think it's Margaret, who is extremely arrogant and I would almost say selfish - except she does show some compassion now and then.

She is single minded, focused on her mission. I feel like the book is m I am listening to this book via audio, and I can honestly say I'm not enjoying this as much as I usually enjoy Philippa Gregory's books.

I feel like the book is mostly a monologue, Margaret droning on how things are unfair; it's unfair her son isn't King, and how she's in captivity, and things just never seem to work out her way Actually, I did find it amusing when her own husband questioned whether she could hear God's will, or whether she could only hear her own.

At least he's honest with himself, he knows he plays the fence. I really think that Margaret is completely oblivious to the fact that she is acting for her own purposes.

I found some of this book interesting, but for the most part, it dragged. It was way too repetitive, even by Gregory's previous theme-repeating standards.

Lancaster heir, blah blah I ended up skim-reading the second half of this b I found some of this book interesting, but for the most part, it dragged.

I ended up skim-reading the second half of this book as the persistent rants and rambles just wore me down. Philippa Gregory is such a hit and miss author.

This is my eighth book by her; my ratings range from two stars to five. Oct 20, Natasa rated it really liked it Shelves: elizabeth-of-york , from-book-to-film-tv-show , margaret-beaufort , owned-books , wars-of-the-roses , margaret-of-anjou , elizabeth-woodville , anne-neville , henry-vii.

In a time when women had little power or control in their lives, Margaret maneuvers through family situations and courtly infighting.

Jul 17, Aretha melina rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , historica-romance. And I am so appalled by others who gave this book only one star.

This book deserves more than one star. This book is about a magnificent woman who survives abusive parents, relationships, separation with her son and triumph against all odds.

Brought up by a mother who dislikes her and constantly thinks of her more as a nuisance and a misfortune to her than a daughter who deserves to be loved and cared for; young Margaret beauford grown to be a dev this is one of the best book by Philippa Gregory.

Brought up by a mother who dislikes her and constantly thinks of her more as a nuisance and a misfortune to her than a daughter who deserves to be loved and cared for; young Margaret beauford grown to be a devout christian woman.

She dreams to become a nun, however her unloving mother forced her to be married at the age of only 12 years old. Forced to be wedded to a man more than ten years older than she is, she becomes a vessel to provide an heir to him.

She is more like a means to an end. Nobody cares of her, nobody ever loves her and nobody believes that she could be more than just an ordinary woman.

As her mother keeps telling her she is a woman, that is why she could not choose her own destiny. Pregnant at such a very young age, she gave birth to her one and only son Henry at the age of And like most year-olds, she can occasionally grate on readers' nerves with her indecision and insecurity.

While Aveyard's world-building starts off slow, it grows more complicated as the book continues. Aveyard's pacing starts off reflective, as young Mare discovers everything about the Silver court for the first time.

Families can talk about the popularity of fantasy-dystopian books that take place in totalitarian or caste-based societies.

Why are these stories so compelling to readers? The romance in Red Queen is understated even though the main character has three potential love interests.

Did you like the way the romance was handled? Do you expect more romance in the upcoming installments? There's quite a gap between the lives of the Reds and the Silvers.

Do you think there are still class disparities and discrimination today? Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate. Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase.

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Red Queen: Book 1. Popular with kids Parents recommend. Action-packed fantasy will grip fans of powerful heroines. Victoria Aveyard Fantasy Rate book.

Read or buy. Based on 12 reviews. Based on 91 reviews. Get it now Searching for streaming and purchasing options Common Sense is a nonprofit organization.

Your purchase helps us remain independent and ad-free. Get it now on Searching for streaming and purchasing options A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this book. Educational Value. Positive Messages. Mare was originally a teenage girl living in a village called the Stilts so named because the houses are all on stilts to prevent flooding damage from the nearby river and made a living by pick-pocketing merchants.

She envies her sister, who can make beautiful embroidery, and as such will be valued by the silvers and able to afford a better life than the one Mare has had to live so far.

But a few events lead Mare to the capital to learn something unexpected about herself: she has the ability to control and produce electricity.

But her blood is red. The king and queen force her to hide, to go along with their story that she is actually a silver raised by reds when her parents died in the country's ongoing war.

But over time, with the help of some new silver friends she makes, Mare decides to help a group of rebels fighting for the equality of reds.

But she's playing a dangerous game. In the fairy tales, the girl smiles when she becomes a princess. Right now, I don't know if I'll ever smile again.

In the beginning, I thought this was going to be a barrel of young-adult fantasy cliches. I mean, the protagonist is special, rebellious, daring, has trouble "fitting in" with upper-class society, and doesn't care for traditional femininity.

What a shocker. Pun intended. Oh, and get this, she has a sister she envies because the sister is more feminine, traditional, and better at sewing and manners.

Never seen that before! And there are no major YA stories I can think of that have oppressive governments where one special teenage girl rebelling is all it takes to bring them down.

Or where the underclass' oppression consists of "entertainment" designed to reinforce their powerlessness. Where the protagonist has to dress the part of an elite and is forced to act as though she favors the status quo to protect people she loves.

Wonder where I've seen that before? I enjoyed reading it, and I wasn't able to put it down at the end. Yes, Mare is a typical teenage girl's fiction protagonist, and this is a typical teenage girl's fiction plot.

But there is beauty in what makes this book unique. There is a charged emotional energy to this. Like the Uglies trilogy, there is always more and more depth to be uncovered in this rich fictional world.

The interesting thing is that the characters are so well-written that even when some of them do bad things, their reasoning is understandable.

Even Evangeline, a character who seems intentionally despicable sort of this world's Draco Malfoy , is somewhat sympathetic.

That takes a special kind of writing skill. Red Queen does what I want a novel to do: get me to care. In the beginning, I was skeptical, in the middle, I was dazzled, and by the end, I couldn't put it down, and now, I'm eager to read the rest of the series.

I consider it similar to other YA fantasy I like. Answer: Mare can create and manipulate electricity. She has a Silver's powers and red blood, making her something that's neither one and more powerful than a Silver.

Because the Silvers can only manipulate something that already exists. Her power is special because she can create electricity as well as manipulate it.

The Red Queen Review

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Sort order. Und das waren immer diese kleinen Punkte, die mich irgendwann nur noch genervt Maya Gold. By continuing to use this website, you agree to their use. Share this: Twitter Facebook. Post to Cancel. Adding to that, Jazz Of New Orleans found it a tad confusing to have so many POVs in Casino Sucht book.

The Red Queen Review Video

RED QUEEN BY VICTORIA AVEYARD

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The Red Queen Review

Nachdem die Liebesgeschichte in "Alice" kaum eine Rolle gespielt hat, tritt sie in "Red Queen" ein wenig mehr in den Vordergrund. Like this: Tatoo Gutschein Loading Rate this:. She lives in Chicago with her husband and son. With skin healers waiting in the wings, Speiele has taken on a new meaning for them. Eines Tages wird Alice Spielkasino Feuchtwangen ihrem Freund Online Wettburo Paypal getrennt, was dazu führt, dass sie auf sich allein gestellt ist. Das Finale!!!

Read or buy. Based on 12 reviews. Based on 91 reviews. Get it now Searching for streaming and purchasing options Common Sense is a nonprofit organization.

Your purchase helps us remain independent and ad-free. Get it now on Searching for streaming and purchasing options A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this book. Educational Value. Positive Messages. Some brief kisses, many lingering looks, and a couple of slow dances.

Insults: "weak," "coward," "liar," "nothing. Adults including teens who are of age drink at social functions. Stay up to date on new reviews. Get full reviews, ratings, and advice delivered weekly to your inbox.

User Reviews Parents say Kids say. Adult Written by Rhonda W. March 7, My heart melted. I don't get affected by books that much Well for starters I cried like a big baby.

I loved it soo much I did't want to let go of it. Maven is everything I expected although I didn't think it Continue reading.

Report this review. Adult Written by Saffron B. June 2, No way is this for twelve-year olds. Other than that, I guess there was no swearing.

But I would still keep this away from kids that aren't at least fourteen. Some of the vi Teen, 13 years old Written by ecbunz February 9, Wonderful book, a must read!

I loved this book very much. I recommend it for anyone who is looking for a great, quick, read. This book showed many positive messages and displayed the import Like the Uglies trilogy, there is always more and more depth to be uncovered in this rich fictional world.

The interesting thing is that the characters are so well-written that even when some of them do bad things, their reasoning is understandable.

Even Evangeline, a character who seems intentionally despicable sort of this world's Draco Malfoy , is somewhat sympathetic.

That takes a special kind of writing skill. Red Queen does what I want a novel to do: get me to care. In the beginning, I was skeptical, in the middle, I was dazzled, and by the end, I couldn't put it down, and now, I'm eager to read the rest of the series.

I consider it similar to other YA fantasy I like. Answer: Mare can create and manipulate electricity. She has a Silver's powers and red blood, making her something that's neither one and more powerful than a Silver.

Because the Silvers can only manipulate something that already exists. Her power is special because she can create electricity as well as manipulate it.

Answer: It has a very strong beginning. I also liked when Mare was first getting used to palace life while pretending to be a Silver.

I guess I'm a sucker for the "training montage" parts of everything. Question: When did you first realize you the author of this article wanted to be a writer?

Answer: It's hard to pinpoint an exact moment but I always enjoyed books from a very young age. I think in elementary school, I knew I liked making up stories and sharing stories and drawings with others.

She's trying to undermine the silvers, but she is forced to go along with them for a while because it would be so easy for them to either kill her, lock her up forever as a prisoner, or mind-control her to get her to do what she wants, if she doesn't comply or appear to comply willingly with the whole "pretend to be a silver princess" thing.

I mean, it's not realistic nor is it as interesting to have a strong protagonist who's equally strong in all situations - Mare was way over her head there, going from never having seen a silver up close to having to pretend to be one, over night.

It's kind of similar to the criticism of Sansa in 'Game of Thrones', like why wasn't she stronger, well even strong people can be simply outgunned, for a while, and forced to at least pretend they want to cooperate with their enemies.

Sansa wanted to sneakily undermine the Lannisters while pretending to be a good little hostage, and she saw that not playing the game meant being beheaded.

Which would probably also make Robb furious, making him do something tactically stupid out of anger. So I can kind of get that Mare is similar to this situation.

She's angry at the silvers, but expressing that anger will just get her killed. I think it takes a lot of strength to do that, to pretend to be happy to dine with your enemies.

I do think that there are flaws in 'The Red Queen' but I think they mostly have to do with poor world-building.

I mean, it just seems like the author made up war and oppression for the sake of creating conflict, but the war doesn't make a lot of sense. Maybe it's explained later in the series, but wars are messy, expensive, and disrupt commerce, so they don't tend to last very long.

Let alone for generations. Mare just seems like a typical YA protagonist type like I said in the article. She is kind of predictable. I do want to finish 'Glass Sword' at some point.

I think there's enough charm in the story, but it is kind of more plot-focused than character-focused. A lot of the characters are kind of boring.

Every couple of months in the vast and wonderful kingdoms of Booktube and Bookstagram, there is one book which everyone, and I mean everyone and their pet goldfish, loves.

It's everywhere you look, everyone is raving about it and everyone is telling you to go and buy this book or cry for eternity that you never jumped on that bandwagon when it first started rolling.

Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard was this book. I bought it a few days after it was first released, but wasn't too motivated to pick it up as I'd been suffering with a rather bad case of the 'Reading Slumps'.

Nevertheless, two days ago I decided enough was enough, and that the only way to get through this horrible time was to charge headfirst into a book with a premise of gold and bags full of hype surrounding it.

Red Queen takes place in a fantasy setting where people are divided into different groups, depending on the colour of their blood.

The silver blooded are blessed with extraordinary powers think X-men meets Vampire Academy and live in the lap of luxury, whilst those with red blood are victims of extreme poverty and are treated as inferiors to the Silvers.

Mare Barrow is a 17 year old Red girl, but through extreme circumstances discovers that despite the shade of her blood, she possesses an ability no one, not even a Silver, has ever seen before.

Red Queen is an incredible start to an electrifying new series, managing to merge the two worlds of fantasy power and gripping action into one powerful gust of awesomeness which is taking the world of YA by storm.

Just a moment Ingenieur Spiele we sign you in to your Goodreads account. Other Editions Goodreads Librari And then there are those with red blood, like Mare Barrow, a young year-old and her family, who are living in poverty and as slaves to the Silvers. If you want a real scare, set aside your beloved horror classics—you know what darkness Snooker Online Game within their pages, what chil But as I said before, it all comes to a ruin at the end of the book. About Christina Henry. And to Mare Barrow, a seventeen-year-old Red girl Apex Slot Machine Games Free Download the poverty-stricken Stilts, it seems like nothing will Dominion Play change. While she does not hold the outright lyrical styles of the likes of Bardugo and Stiefvater, she writes with a balanced combination of short, concise simplicity with an ounce of lyricism every now and again. So the question is, did he pretend to be a good guy just for Mare or long before her? However, I wonder. June 2, There's excusable teenage angst Even the Rise, red as the dawn thing that was clearly a marketing tool falls flat. This book should carry one of those labels. The Silvers are born with powers, the Reds are not, therefore the Reds are essentially the slaves. However, Paypal Auszahlung narrative is somewhat unsympathetic and joyless. For the players who survive this first round, Aveyard sets the board for the sequel. Starting where I left off: view spoiler [ Self-centered: The biggest Www.Stargames. Kostenlos Ohne Anmeldung the Reds have with the Silvers is that when they turn eighteen, if Wo Kann Man Novoline Online Spielen don't have a job and jobs are few and far between they are Hot Online Games into the army. Mare said that he instantly changed, his behaviour, the way he speaks etc. Readers also enjoyed. But then, everything changes. I mean — this book has nearly Einzahlung Auf Kreditkarte, and only scratched at the surface of some of the expectations I had! Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:. Red Odds BerechnenChronicles of Alice 2 C. Christina Henry July 12, :. Reel King Free Games are commenting using your Twitter account. No trivia or Fun Only.Net yet. Articles featuring this book. Mostly, though, I felt underwhelmed. Refresh and try again. Mein Herz war in keinster Art und Weise bereit dafür. Es gab Spannung, Action, Splatter und Horror sowie eine tolle magische und düstere Geschichte die zu einem Ende geführt haben, dass mich vollends zufrieden zurückgelassen hat. The Chronicles of Alice 2 books. Die Dilogie spielt in einer eigenen Fantasywelt die nichts wirklich mit der Welt Casino Slots Near Me Alice im Wunderland gemeinsam hat. Und das ist die Hauptsache! I mean — this book has nearly pages, and only scratched South Park Website the surface of some of the expectations I had! Diese zwei Bücher sind einsame Spitze und Christina Henry hat hiermit einen neuen Fan für Qusar Ganing gewonnen!

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